Jackes-Eglinton Site

Site Name:

Jackes-Eglinton

County:

York

Borden Number:

Township:

Toronto

Date Excavated:

1887-1950s

Excavated By:

David Boyle, Everett James Case

About the Site:

The Jackes (Eglinton) site is located northwest of Eglinton and Avenue Roads in Toronto, and is today covered by Allanby Public School and housing developments. However, it was the subject of archaeological investigation as early as 1887, when David Boyle, who was later appointed provincial archaeologist, described an artificial mound, with scatters of bone, chert and pottery, on a site that was likely several acres in size (Noble 1974). Many of the objects collected by Boyle from the site were donated to the Canadian Institute (now the Royal Ontario Museum).

The site was subject to decades of looting for private collections, and it is impossible to estimate how much of the site was damaged and how many artifacts were removed during that period. The Sustainable Archaeology McMaster assemblage pertains solely to the collection of Everett James Case, which was collected between 1930 and 1950 and was donated to McMaster after his death in 1955.

The site is notably the best documented Iroquoian village (ca. 1450-1475) in the City of Toronto, though it was unfortunately destroyed by development before systematic archaeological investigations were required.

At SA McMaster:

Sustainable Archaeology McMaster houses one box of material pertaining to the Jackes-Eglinton site, with 102 artifacts including ceramics, faunal and lithics (see Noble 1974 for description). Because the collections are from personal digging that Case did in the 1930s and 1950s, they are without context.

Note all locations are approximate and do not represent actual archaeological sites. 

Resources about this site:

Noble, W.C. (1974). The Jackes (Eglinton) Site: Another Facet of Southern Huron Development in the Toronto Region. Ontario Archaeology 22: 3-31.

Sylvester, E. (2016). A Look Inside the Buried Huron Village in the Heart of Toronto. Torontoist June 2016. URL: http://torontoist.com/2016/06/the-buried-huron-village-in-the-heart-of-toronto/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *